On Language in Scripts (Part III)

Only tell the reader what is being seen.

When describing people, places and situations never tell the reader something that can’t be seen by a person sitting in the theater watching the movie unfold. Resist the urge to explain or provide exposition. Do not give us backstory or the inner monologue of any character. Do not describe how someone is feeling. Sure, there exceptions. Some writers get away with…

--

--

--

Film critic turned film schooler turned screenwriter turned free advice giver. Presenting thoughts on Screenwriting, Hollywood, and sometimes Social Marketing.

Love podcasts or audiobooks? Learn on the go with our new app.

Recommended from Medium

Why Should Great Writers Work For Peanuts?

HOW TO WRITE WHAT YOU THOUGHT IN ESSAY

How Do You Say Nothing?

My Journey as a Struggling Writer

Triple Your Learning Efficiency By Writing in a New Language

Feeling Like Starting From Square One… I Woke With A Desire To Write About The STEEMing HIVE…

I Write at This Coffee Shop Because Everyone Here Thinks I’m a Lazy Jackass

What it Took to Publish My First Medium Post

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store
p.w. alex&er

p.w. alex&er

Film critic turned film schooler turned screenwriter turned free advice giver. Presenting thoughts on Screenwriting, Hollywood, and sometimes Social Marketing.

More from Medium

What Authors Say About Their Business: Part 3

Social Media for Writers — A Warning

Respect Your Audience or Get Cancelled

Welcome to Daring Diaries